German Courses - Fall 2021

Language Courses

GER 001-003 and 020-022: Elementary and Intermediate Language Instruction


Undergraduate Courses

GER 011: (Cross-Listed with COM 011): Travel & Modern World
Instructor: TBA

Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Examination of travel as an essential human activity and experience of global modernity and cross-cultural encounters from the 18th to the 21st century with an emphasis on German-speaking culture. Travelogues, literature, art, memoirs, and films in English translation. (Same course as COM 011.) GE credit: AH, VL, WC, WE.

GER 101A: Survey of German Lit, 800-1800
Prof. Carlee Arnett

Lecture/Discussion—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing. Prerequisite(s): GER 022; or Consent of Instructor. German literature from the Middle Ages to Classicism (800-1800) with an overview of major movements and authors. GE credit: AH, OL, VL, WC, WE.

GER 103: German Writing Skills
Kirsten Harjes

Lecture—3 hour(s); Extensive Writing—1 hour(s). Prerequisite(s): GER 022; or Consent of Instructor. Practice in different kinds of writing, such as abstracts, correspondence, lecture summaries, analysis of or response to short literary texts. GE credit: AH, OL, WC, WE.

GER 120: Survey of German Culture
Kirsten Harjes


Graduate Courses

GER 285: Middle High German Lit
Prof. Carlee Arnett
Tuesdays, 1:10-4:00

Middle High German Literature is a survey of the writings of the High Middle Ages.  We will cover topics such as courtly love and chivalry, by reading an epic poem.  We will also look at other genres of the time that reflect the culture of the time.  These might include the poems and the lives of the travelling entertainers who wrote them or letters that show the life of a family.  The poems and epics are meant to entertain but they also have a larger function in society that we can explore.  No knowledge of German or Middle High German is required.

GER 297: Special Topics in German Lit - Empire
Prof. Chunjie Zhang
Thursdays, 1:10-4:00

This graduate seminar will survey imperialism and colonialism and their relationship to (primarily German-language) literature and culture from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Major themes include scientific expedition, theory of race, the exhibition of empire, world literature, and migration. Theoretical readings include works by John Locke, Johann Gottfried Herder, Edmund Burke, Charles Darwin, Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Aamir Mufti, Linda Smith, and Achille Mbembe. Literary works include Karl May, Joseph Conrad, Franz Kafka, Peter Altenberg, and Ilija Trojanow.  

GER 390A: Teaching of German in College
Kirsten Harjes
CRN: 52954

Lecture & Discussion: 2 hours, in addition to: consent to regular classroom observations, participation in the peer observation program, biweekly meetings to create testing and other classroom materials. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Required of all teaching assistants. (S/U grading only.)