Spring 2014

 

Please click here to see the Spring Schedule as a PDF
 


Lower Division Courses


German 1. Elementary German (5 units)
Giovanna Montenegro

M-F 8:00 - 8:50A
125 Olson
CRN 26093

Course Description: This is an introduction to German grammar and development of all language skills in a cultural context with special emphasis on communication.

Course Placement: Students who have successfully completed, with a C- or better, German 2 or 3 in the 10th or higher grade in high school may receive unit credit for this course on a P/NP grading basis only. Although a passing grade will be charged to the student's P/NP option, no petition is required. All other students will receive a letter grade unless a P/NP petition is filed. For more information, please contact the instructor or the German staff adviser directly.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

Option 1:
- Textbook: Vorsprung 3rd edition (loose-leaf or bound) by Thomas Lovik, Douglas Guy and Monika Chavez (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2013)
- a Quia Access Code for all of the homework and lab assignments (course code provided by instructor)

Option 2:
- eBook version of Vorsprung 3rd edition (order ISBN10:1-133-60735-7 at http://www.cengagebrain.com/shop/isbn/9781133607359; it should cost about $117). If you are considering the eBook, you must be sure that you can bring your ipad/laptop to class every day.
- a Quia Access Code for all of the homework and lab assignments (course code provided by instructor).


German 3. Elementary German (5 units)

Section Instructor Day/Time Room CRN
01 Konrad Mathesius M-F 8:00 - 8:50A 227 Olson 26094
02 Katja Herges M-F 9:00 - 9:50A 235 Wellman 26095
03 Amila Becirbegovic M-F 10:00 - 10:50A 235 Wellman 26096

Course Description: This is the continuation of German 2 in areas of grammar and the basic language skills, and the last course in the Elementary German series.

Prerequisite: German 2.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

Option 1:
- Textbook: Vorsprung 3rd edition (loose-leaf or bound) by Thomas Lovik, Douglas Guy and Monika Chavez (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2013)
- a Quia Access Code for all of the homework and lab assignments (course code provided by instructor)

Option 2:
- eBook version of Vorsprung 3rd edition (order ISBN10:1-133-60735-7 at http://www.cengagebrain.com/shop/isbn/9781133607359; it should cost about $117). If you are considering the eBook, you must be sure that you can bring your ipad/laptop to class every day.
- a Quia Access Code for all of the homework and lab assignments (course code provided by instructor).


German 20. Intermediate German (4 units)
Kirsten Harjes

MWF 10:00 - 10:50A
101 Wellman
CRN 26098

Course Description: This is the first course of 2nd year German. Students will review grammar, and begin to read and discuss short, literary texts of cultural and historical interest. Class is conducted in German.

Prerequisite: German 3.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Textbooks:

  • Tobias Barske, et al., Denk Mal! Deutsch ohne Grenzen - with SuperSite Access  (Vista Higher Learning, 2012)


German 22. Intermediate German (4 units)
Cameron Mortimer

MWF 11:00 - 11:50A
101 Wellman
CRN 26099

Course Description: This is the continuation of German 21. This course is a review of grammatical principles by means of written exercises; expanding of vocabulary through readings of modern texts.

Prerequisite: German 21.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Textbooks:

  • Instructor will provide materials online


German 45. Vampires and Other Horrors in Film and Media (4 units)   [Same as FMS 045]    IN ENGLISH
Kirsten Harjes

Lecture: MW 2:10 - 3:00P, 1227 Haring
Film Viewing: M 7:00 - 10:00P, 234 Wellman

Discussion Sec. Discussion Leader Day/Time Room CRN
A01 Elisabeth Lore   R 4:10 - 5:00P 159 Olson 42684
A02 Elisabeth Lore R 5:10 - 6:00P 105 Olson 42685
A03 Brandon Winter    F 10:00 - 10:50A 151 Olson 42686
A04 Brandon Winter F 11:00 - 11:50A 151 Olson 42687

Course Description: History of representations of vampires and the undead generally from the 16th through 21st centuries. Emphasis on transnational history of the vampire genre; psychologies of horror effects; issues of race, gender, and class; intersections with prejudice, medicine, modernity.

Prerequisite: None.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): American Cultures, Arts & Humanities, Domestic Diversity, Oral Literacy, Visual Literacy, World Cultures, and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 2 hours; Discussion - 1 hour; Film Viewing - 3 hours.

Textbook:

  • Bram Stoker, Dracula  (W.W. Norton & Company, 1996)
     

Upper Division Courses


German 101B. Survey of German Literature, 1800-Present (4 units)
Chunjie Zhang

MWF 10:00 - 10:50A
117 Olson
CRN 42680

Course Description: This course surveys German literature between the year of 1800 and the present by attending to exemplary texts from the major literary moments of these years: the Enlightenment, the Storm and Stress period, the Romantic period, the Young Germany and Vormärz periods, Expressionism and other forms of the Weimar avant-garde, postwar realism, literature of the GDR, non-ethnic-German literature will all be discussed. The course will treat similarities and differences among these movements, and question how legitimate such groupings are in general. Along these lines, the course will discuss how these texts both reflect and resist the norms of the moments to which they (purportedly) belong. The course will also cover scholarly analyses of literary texts, such that students will garner a sense of the recent and current state of scholarly research as it relates to German literature in these years. It will discuss the impact of these movements on the visual arts, including painting and film.

Prerequisite: German 22.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours.

Textbooks:

  • Martin Durrell, et al., German Grammar Pack: Practising German Grammar [3rd Edition]  (Routledge, 2011)

[RECOMMENDED]

  • Hans Wellman, Langenscheidt Großwörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache  (Langenscheidt, 2010)
     

German 120. German Culture (4 units)
Chunjie Zhang

MW 12:10 - 2:00P
103 Wellman
CRN 26118

Course Description: This course will explore German culture through multimedia forms. We will deal with major political, social, and cultural aspects after 1945 through music, art, theater, radio plays, films, and literature.

We will start the course discussing German political singer/songwriters such as Wolf Biermann and Franz Josef Degenhardt and internationally well-known German art exhibitions such as dOKUMENTA and German artists such as Joseph Beuys. Responding to the experience of World War II, the radio play became a very popular and important genre after 1945 in Germany. We will talk about award-winning writer Ingeborg Bachmann's radio play The Good God of Manhattan and explore the intertextuality between this radio play and the drama The Good Person of Szechwan by Bertolt Brecht, arguably the most famous Marxist playwright and writer in German literature of the twentieth century and beyond. We will also discuss the role of literature by reading Peter Handke's novel A Short Letter for a Long Farewell. In the end, we will deal with German cinema and discuss major trends, directors such as Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Wim Wenders, and topics such as immigrants in Germany and the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Prerequisite: German 22.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures, and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Ingeborg Bachmann, Die Hörspiele  (Piper Taschenbuch, 1976)
  • Bertolt Brecht, Der Gute Mensch von Sezuan  (Suhrkamp Verlag, 1964)
  • Martin Durrell, et al., German Grammar Pack: Practising German Grammar [3rd Edition]  (Routledge, 2011)

[RECOMMENDED]

  • Hans Wellman, Langenscheidt Großwörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache  (Langenscheidt, 2010)
     

German 124. Realistisches Erzählen in der neueren deutschen Literatur / Realistic Narrations in Modern German Literature (4 units)
Stephan Kammer

TR 1:40 - 3:00P
107 Wellman
CRN 42681

Course Description: Far from providing just a stylistic device for a few decades of the 19th century, narrative appropriations of reality (Wirklichkeit) are under consideration since the beginnings of modern german literature. In these discussions, questions of poetical and narrative (re)presentation (Darstellung) as well as of the selection of adequate literary topics face a wide range of discourses 'external' to poetics. Be it the debates on verisimilitude/probability (Wahrscheinlichkeit) in early 18th century, the differentiations of idealism/realism (established ca. 1800) or realism/naturalism, the post-World-War-I programme of Neue Sachlichkeit, be it Protest-Realismus (K. Krauthausen) of the late 1960s or the current revival of documentary writing—in all these discussions poetics encounters its philosophical, scientific, political, media-related, etc., environment. Some of these negotiations will be discussed, their positions being confronted with exemplary readings from 18th to 21st century German literature.

Prerequisite: German 22.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Kathrin Röggla, really ground zero. 11. september und folgendes  (Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, 2004)
  • Bertolt Brecht, Dreigroschenroman  (Suhrkamp Verlag, 1991)
  • Gottfried Keller, Martin Salander: Roman  (Verlag Nagel & Kimche AG, 2003)
  • Hans Blumenberg, Wirklichkeiten, in denen wir leben  (Reclam, 1986)
  • Joachim H. Campe, Robinson der Jüngere  (Reclam, 2000)
     

German 176A. Classic Weimar Cinema (4 units)    [Same as FMS 176A]   IN ENGLISH
Kirsten Harjes

Lecture: TR 12:10 - 1:30P, 217 Art
Film Viewing: W 6:10 - 9:00P, 2016 Haring
CRN 42682

Course Description: German Weimar (1919-1933) cinema. Fritz Lang, F.W. Murnau, and G.W. Pabst among others. Influence on world-wide (esp. Hollywood) film genres such as film noir, horror, science fiction, and melodrama. Not open for credit to students who have completed Humanities 176.

Prerequisite: Humanities 1.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, Visual Literacy, World Cultures, and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Film Viewing - 3 hours.

Textbooks:

  • Noah Isenberg, Weimar CInema: An Essential Guide to Classic Films of the Era  (Columbia University Press, 2009)
  • Colin Storer, A Short History of the Weimar Republic  (I.B. Tauris, 2013)
     

Graduate Courses


German 257. Heinrich von Kleist's Works (4 units)
Elisabeth Krimmer

T 1:10 - 4:00P
412B Sproul
CRN 42683

Course Description: This course examines the life and works of Heinrich von Kleist against the backdrop of revolutionary turmoil in Europe and the Americas and the Wars of Liberation. It also situates Kleist with respect to German Classicism and Romanticism and contemporary philosophy, in particular, Kant and Fichte.

The offspring of an aristocratic military family, Kleist lived a tumultuous life: he embarked on a career as an officer, was arrested as a spy, held various government positions, started a newspaper, and committed murder-suicide in 1811. His texts are notorious for their unique style and great ideological pliability. His drama Hermannsschlacht, for example, was the most performed play during the Third Reich, but is also a favorite of the anti-imperial left. In exploring Kleist’s works, we will pay particular attention to conceptualizations of the body, language, and identity, the representation of race and gender, and concepts of war and terrorism.

Texts to be discussed include Michael KohlhaasPenthesileaDie Marquise von OThe Earthquake in Chile,Betrothal in St. DomingoThe Broken JugOn the Gradual Production of Thoughts while Speaking, and others.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • None


German 297. Poetik der Erfindung in der Neuzeit / Poetics of Invention in the Modern Age (4 units) 
Stephan Kammer

W 5:10 - 8:00P
412B Sproul
CRN 26159

Course Description:  Making an invention means to add something new to the world—this seems to be as mundane as evident, though a series of economic, legal, and of course fabricating procedures is predicated thereon. But starting with ancient rhetoric, quite contrary to this understanding invention has to be considered as a choice of arguments, elements of knowledge or manual skills suitable for a given situation. In the tradition of artes, invention therefore has been closely and constitutionally connected with (latent) possibilities rather than with (future) potentials. Accordingly, not until the end of 18th century German language semantically as well as conceptually differentiates between finden and erfinden. Friedrich Gottlieb Klopstock's œuvre, in particular his Gelehrtenrepublik, represents the pivotal point between artes and art, between the 'ancient' and the 'modern' understanding of invention. It will serve us both to explore these two systems of invention and their emerging conflicts, and to gather the elements and poetics of modern invention which subsequently will be pursued in the variety of their (literary) manifestations in 19th and early 20th centuries.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Hans Blumenberg, Geistesgeschichte der Technik  (Suhrkamp Verlag, 2009)


Other Classes Taught by German Faculty


Humanities 13: "Witches: Myth and Historical Reality" (4 units)
Elisabeth Krimmer

TR 10:30 - 11:50A
3 Kleiber
CRN 42678