Winter 2011

Lower Division Courses

German 2: Elementary German (5 Units)

Anja Stender (sec. 1, M-F 08:00 - 08:50, 227 Olson) CRN 26415

Verena Hutter (sec. 2, M-F 09:00 - 09:50, 227 Olson) CRN 26416

Cameron Mortimer (sec. 3, M-F 10:00 - 10:50, 205 Wellman) CRN 26417

This is a continuation of German 1 in areas of grammar and the basic language skills.

Prerequisite: German 1.

Course Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Texts:

  • Thomas A. Lovik, Vorsprung, 2nd edition (Textbook)
  • Thomas A. Lovik, Student Activities Manual - Used with Vorsprung (Workbook)

German 3: Elementary German (5 units)

Marcella Livi (M-F 09:00 - 09:50, 151 Olson) CRN 26418

Course Description: This is a continuation of German 2 in areas of grammar and the basic language skills and the last course in the elementary language sequence.

Prerequisite: German 2.

Course Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Texts:

  • Thomas A. Lovik, Vorsprung, 2nd edition (Textbook)
  • Thomas A. Lovik, Student Activities Manual - Used with Vorsprung (Workbook)

German 21: Intermediate German (4 units)

Karina Deifel* (MWF 09:00 - 09:50, 115 Wellman) CRN 26419

Jared Loehrmann* (MWF 10:00 - 10:50, 115 Wellman) CRN 26420

This is the continuation of German 20. This course is a review of grammatical principles by means of written exercises; expanding of vocabulary through readings of modern texts.

Prerequisite: German 20.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Texts:

  • Rankin Wells, Handbuch zur Deutschen Grammatik: Wiederholen und Andwenden, 5th edition
  • Morewedge, Mittlesen Mitteilen, 4th edition

German 22: Intermediate German (4 units)

Sascha Gerhards (MWF 11:00 - 11:50, 207 Wellman) CRN 26412

This is the continuation of German 21 and wraps up the Intermediate German sequence. This course is a review of grammatical principles by means of written exercises; expanding of vocabulary through readings of modern texts.

Prerequisite: German 21.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Text:

  • A Course Reader (available from Davis Copy Shop)

Upper Division Courses

German 101B: Survey of German Literature, 1800-Present (4 Units)

Harriet Jernigan, Lecturer NEW INSTRUCTOR (TR 01:40 - 03:00, 108 Hoagland) CRN 26445

This course surveys German literature between the year of 1800 and the present by attending to exemplary texts from the major literary moments of these years: the Enlightenment, the Storm and Stress period, the Romantic period, the Young Germany and Vormärz periods, Expressionism and other forms of the Weimar avant-garde, postwar realism, literature of the GDR, non-ethnic-German literature will all be discussed. The course will treat similarities and differences among these movements, and question how legitimate such groupings are in general. Along these lines, the course will discuss how these texts both reflect and resist the norms of the moments to which they (purportedly) belong. The course will also cover scholarly analyses of literary texts, such that students will garner a sense of the recent and current state of scholarly research as it relates to German literature in these years. It will discuss the impact of these movements on the visual arts, including painting and film.

Prerequisite: German 22.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Texts:

  • A Course Reader

German 115: German Literature Since 1945 (4 Units)

Helmut Schneider, Visiting Professor (TR 09:00 - 10:20, 267 Olson) CRN 43572

Major writers of the post-war generation of Austria, Switzerland and Germany: novelists, such as Böll, Grass, Johnson, Walser, Handke; playwrights such as Frisch, Dürrentmatt and Hochhuth; and poets, such as Celan, Enzensberger, and Aichinger. May be repeated for credit in different topic area.

Dr. Helmut Schneider is the Max Kade Visting Professor this academic year. For any inquiries about the course, contact the Main Office.

Prerequisite: NONE (Knowledge of German is not required).

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Texts:

  • Dürrenmatt, Der Besuch der alten Dame: Eine tragische Komodie (Verlag, 1998)
  • Peter Handke, Wunschloses Unglück (Verlag)
  • Bernhard Schlink, Der Vorleser (Taschenbuch Verlag, 1995)
  • Uwe Timm, Am Beispiel meines Bruders (Verlag)

 

 

Graduate Courses

German 257: Heinrich von Kleist (4 Units)

Elisabeth Krimmer, Associate Professor (R 12:30 - 03:00 NEW TIME, 412B Sproul) CRN 43573

This course focuses on the life and works of Heinrich von Kleist, an eighteenth-century author whose work speaks to postmodern sensitivities in unique and challenging ways. Kleists dramas, stories, and essays frequently deal with questions of personal identity, the relation between body and identity, and the connection between violence and nationhood. Kleist explores failures of reason, human justice, and interpersonal communication in daring and radical ways. Texts to be discussed include Hermannsschlacht, Amphitryon, Penthesilea, Familie Schroffenstein, Der zerbrochene Krug, Das Erdbeben in Chili, and Uber das Marionettentheater.

Prerequisite: Graduate student standing or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Text:

  • Heinrich von Kleist, Sämtliche Werke und Briefe: Zweibändige Ausgabe in einem Band (Taschenbuch Verlag, 2001)

German 259: Studies in Kafka (4 Units)

Helmut Schneider, Visiting Professor (T 05:10 - 08:00, 412B Sproul) CRN 43574

(Kafka’s slim fictional work has continuously drawn the attention not only of readers, writers, and critics, but also of various prominent philosophers. Whenever a new literary theory is developed, Kafka’s texts are made a touchstone for theoretical elaboration. And yet the history of Kafka’s reception shows a striking difference between, on the one hand, those interpreters who are convinced that Kafka’s texts are full of – hidden – meanings, and, on the other hand, those who claim the exact opposite: that Kafka is concerned with nothing but the permanent destruction of understanding itself. In this graduate seminar we will examine some of Kafka’s shorter prose, especially the narrative methods in The Metamorphosis and In the Penal Colony, as well as his famous novel The Trial. We will also have a closer look at a number of texts that engage Kafka’s oeuvre to elaborate theoretical questions, including essays by Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, Maurice Blanchot, and Jacques Derrida.

Dr. Helmut Schneider is the Max Kade Visting Professor this academic year. For any inquiries about the course, contact the Main Office.

Prerequisite: Graduate student standing or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Texts (in German):

  • Franz Kafka and Roger Hermes (ed.), Die Erzählungen und andere ausgewählte Prosa (Taschenbuch Verlag, 1996)
  • Franz Kafka, Der Proceß (Taschenbuch Verlag, 1994)
  • Franz Kafka, Der Vershollene (Amerika) (Taschenbuch Verlag, 1994)

Texts (English Translation):

  • Franz Kafka and Ritchie Robertson (ed.), The Trial (Oxford)
  • Franz Kafka and Nahum N. Glatzer (ed.), The Complete Stories (Schoken Books)
  • Franz Kafka and Willa and Edwin Muir (eds.), Amerika (Pantheon Books)

German 291: Foreign Language Instruction in Classroom (4 units)

Carlee Arnett, Associate Professor (M 1:10 - 3:00, 412B Sproul) CRN 44472

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Text:

  • A Course Reader

 

Other Courses Taught by German Faculty

Comparative Literature 7: Literature of Fantasy and the Supernatural (by Prof. Gail Finney)

Critical Theory 200B: Problems in Critical Theory - "What Is Called Thinking Exemplary Texts?" (by Prof. Gerhard Richter)

Humanities 13: Witches - Myth and Historical Reality (by Prof. Elisabeth Krimmer)

Humanities 144: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud (by Prof. Gerhard Richter)