Spring 2010

Lower Division Courses

German 1: Elementary German (5 Units)

STAFF (M-F 08:00 - 08:50, 103 Wellman) CRN 66134

This is an introduction to German grammar and development of all language skills in a cultural context with special emphasis on communication.

Course Placement:Students who have successfully completed, with a C- or better, German 2 or 3 in the 10th or higher grade in high school may receive unit credit for this course on a P/NP grading basis only. Although a passing grade will be charged to the student's P/NP option, no petition is required. All other students will receive a letter grade unless a P/NP petition is filed. For more information, please contact the instructor or the German staff adviser directly.

Course Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Thomas A. Lovik, Vorsprung, 2nd edition (Textbook)
  • Thomas A. Lovik, Student Activities Manual - Used with Vorsprung (Workbook)

German 3: Elementary German (5 units)

STAFF (sec. 1, M-F 09:00 - 09:50, 103 Wellman) CRN 66136

STAFF (sec. 2, M-F 10:00 - 10:50, 267 Olson) CRN 66137

STAFF (sec. 3, M-F 11:00 - 11:50, 267 Olson) CRN 66138

Course Description: This is the completion of grammar sequence and continuing practice of all language skills in a cultural context.

Prerequisite: course 2.

Course Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • Thomas A. Lovik, Vorsprung, 2nd edition (Textbook)
  • Thomas A. Lovik, Student Activities Manual - Used with Vorsprung (Workbook)

German 20: Intermediate German (4 Units)

STAFF (MWF 10:00 - 10:50, 103 Wellman) CRN 66139

Course Description: This is the first course of 2nd year German. Students will review grammar, and begin to read and discuss short, literary texts of cultural and historical interest. Class is conducted in German.

Prerequisite: course 3.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Short papers.

Textbooks:

  • Rosemarie Morewedge and Larry Wells (eds.), Mitlesen/Mitteilen
  • Jamie Rankin and Larry Wells (eds.), Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik

German 22: Composition and Conversation (4 Units)

STAFF (MWF 11:00 - 11:50, 103 Wellman) CRN 66140

Course Description: This course continues along the lines of German 21 to provide further practice in the essential language skills, to expand command of vocabulary and idiomatic usage, and to provide techniques for the interpretation and greater understanding of literary texts. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite: course 21 or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Short Papers.

Textbooks:

  • Patrick Suskind, Das Parfum
  • A Course Reader (Available at the Davis Copy Shop)

Upper Division Courses

German 120: Survey of German Culture (4 Units)

Clifford Bernd, Professor (MWF 09:00 - 09:50, 209 Olson) CRN 82988

Course Description: This course addresses itself to the colorful picture of major German contributions to Western civilization. Lectures in German, readings from well-annotated texts and slide shows will acquaint the student with such topics as: (1) Charlemagne and the founding of the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation, (2) the flowering of the arts in the Middle Ages, (3) Albrecht Dürer and the Renaissance, (4) the Protestant Reformation, (5) the Catholic Counter Reformation, (6) Classicism, (7) Romanticism, (8) the era of Bismarck, (9) the roaring 1920’s, (10) the rebirth of German culture out of the ashes of world War II. GE credit: ArtHum. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite: course 22 or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook: A course reader (Available at the Davis Copy Shop)

German 127: Major Writer in German - Young Goethe (4 Units)

Harriet Jernigan, Lecturer (TR 12:10 - 01:30, 211 Wellman) CRN 83016

Course Description: An expanded description is currently not available at the moment. Please contact the instructor directly at hvjernigan@ucdavis.edu. GE Credit: ArtHum.

Prerequisite: course 22 or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks: A Course Reader

German 185: Age of Bismark (4 Units)

Clifford Bernd, Professor (MWF 11:00-11:50, 235 Wellman) CRN 82989

Course Description: This course’s aim is to introduce students to lyrical, prose fictional, and dramatic representation of Bismarckian politics and society. We shall begin with Storm’s poetry as a mirror of the political entanglements that led to Bismarck’s rise to power. Next will follow a short novel by Fontane, in which the hero vacillates between two irreconcilable worlds: the one demanding his unwavering conformity to the conventions of the Prussian aristocracy, the other filled with the enchantment of a secret love for a woman below him in social standing. The course concludes with a play by Hauptmann, in which a hint of incest and the off-stage birth of a still-born child were enough to outrage the prim susceptibilities of Bismarckian theater-goers and give the stage of the 1890s more color and candor that it had known in decades. Splendidly annotated modern editions of the texts will be used to facilitate easier access to vocabulary, content, and meaning. GE credit: ArtHum. Conducted in German.

Prerequisite: course 22 or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • A Course Reader

Graduate Courses

German 297 (Sec. 1): Light-Writing: Literature - Photography - Philosophy (4 Units)

Gerhard Richter, Professor (T 01:10 - 04:00, 412B Sproul) CRN 82991

Course Description: : "I didn't draw any people," Kafka once wrote, "I told a story. Those are pictures, only pictures...one takes photographs of things in order to forget them. My stories are a way of closing my eyes." Kafka's sentences invite us to reflect upon the relationship between literature, photography, and philosophy—from the first heliograph in 1826 and the inception of the daguerreotype in 1839 to the digital image of today's so-called postmodern condition. Taking as our point of departure the conceptual interstices of literature and "light-writing," we will address selected issues in the historical and theoretical interaction among word, image, and critical thought. We will investigate the extent to which texts and photographic images share a common relationship to time, finitude, loss, and mourning. Texts by Walter Benjamin, Franz Kafka, Siegfried Kracauer, Marcel Proust, Roland Barthes, Martin Heidegger, Jacques Derrida, and others.

Seminar will be taught in English and is open to graduate students from a variety of fields. It can also be counted as an official elective for the Designated Emphasis in Critical Theory.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Extensive Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Barthes, Camera Lucida
  • Clarke, Photography
  • Trachtenberg, Classic Essays on Photography

German 297 (Sec. 2): Space, Place, and Mobility in Recent Cultural Theory (4 Units)

Jaimey Fisher, Associate Professor (R 02:10 - 05:00, 412B Sproul) CRN 82987

Course Description:: The seminar aims to engage with the conceptual terms, via some of the central texts, of what has been called the spatial turn in cultural theory. Why (and in what forms) have notions of space and spatiality gained such critical purchase across a wide array of fields, including literary criticism, media studies, art, history, anthropology, etc.? We will query this among other questions, like: what, precisely, is to be gained by focusing on space and the spatial aspects of social and cultural experience; how studies of space and spatiality intersect (or, too often, do not) history and economy; whether and in what inflections space and spatiality have remained overly vague. Topics to include: spatial vs. temporal orientation, space vs. place and the issues of scale therein, poetics and production of space, movement and mobility, public and private spheres, intersections of space with race/class/genre, urban vs. rural spaces, intersections of space with the body, varied mappings of space, with relevant writings by Gaston Bachelard, Doreen Massey, Henri Lefebvre, Walter Benjamin, David Harvey, Gillian Rose, Fredric Jameson, Derek Gregory, Edward Soja, Michel de Certeau, among others.

Seminar will be taught in English and is open to graduate students from a variety of fields. It can also be counted as an official elective for the Designated Emphasis in Critical Theory.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Consent of Instructor.

Course Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Extensive Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Bachelard, Poetics of Space
  • Harvey,Condition of Postmodernity
  • LeFebvre, Production of Space
  • Benjamin, Writer of Modern Life
  • Harvey, Paris, Capital of Modernity
  • Massey, For Space

German 396: Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4 Units)

Carlee Arnett, Associate Professor

Course Description: Theoretical instruction in modern teaching methods and demonstration of their practical application. Required of new teaching assistants.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or Consent of Instructor.

Other Courses Taught by German Faculty

This information is currently not available at the moment. For any other inquiries, contact the Main Office at (530)752-4999.