Fall 2015

Please click here to see the Fall Schedule as a PDF


  LOWER DIVISION COURSES  


German 001. Elementary German (5 units)

Section Instructor Day/Time Room CRN
01 Monika Sierkowska  MTWRF 8:00-8:50A 125 Olson Hall 55909
02 Astrid Exel MTWRF 9:00-9:50A 125 Olson Hall 55910
03 Cameron Mortimer MTWRF 10:00-10:50A 101 Wellman Hall 55911
04 Katja Herges MTWRF 8:00-8:50A 146 Robbins Hall 73670

Course Description: This is an introduction to German grammar and development of all language skills in a cultural context with special emphasis on communication.

Course Placement: Students who have successfully completed, with a C- or better, German 002 or 003 in the 10th or higher grade in high school may receive unit credit for this course on a P/NP grading basis only. Although a passing grade will be charged to the student's P/NP option, no petition is required. All other students will receive a letter grade unless a P/NP petition is filed. For more information, please directly contact the instructor or the German staff adviser, Amy Lowrey (allowrey@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • To be ordered directly from the publisher - an announcement will be posted in SmartSite before instruction begins with directions.
     

German 002. Elementary German (5 units)
Karina Deifel

MTWRF 9:00-9:50A
101 Olson Hall
CRN 55912

Course Description: This is the continuation of German 001 in areas of grammar and the basic language skills, and the second course in the Elementary German series.

Prerequisite: German 001.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • To be ordered directly from the publisher - an announcement will be posted in SmartSite before instruction begins with directions.
     

German 020. Intermediate German (4 units)
Lauren Nossett

MWF 9:00-9:50A
229 Wellman Hall
CRN 55913

Course Description: This is the first course of 2nd year German. Students will review grammar, and begin to read and discuss short, literary texts of cultural and historical interest. Class is conducted in German.

Prerequisite: German 003.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Textbook:

  • Tobias Barske, et al., Denk Mal! Deutsch ohne Grenzen - with SuperSite Access  (Vista Higher Learning, 2012)
     

German 021. Intermediate German (4 units)
Brandon Winter

MWF 11:00-11:50A
1120 Hart Hall
CRN 55914

Course Description: Review of grammatical principles by means of written exercises, expanding of vocabulary through readings of modern texts.

Prerequisite: German 020.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Textbook:

  • Tobias Barske, et al., Denk Mal! Deutsch ohne Grenzen - with SuperSite Access  (Vista Higher Learning, 2012)
     

  UPPER DIVISION COURSES  


German 103. Writing Skills in German (4 units)
Kirsten Harjes

MWF 1:10 - 2:00P
151 Olson Hall
CRN 73669

Course Description: This course focuses on German writing skills in different media and genres: emails, letters, résumés, job applications, essays and essay abstracts, term papers, film reviews, and journalistic articles. The course helps students expand vocabulary, improve grammar skills, and raise their awareness of styles and cultural issues related to writing for various audiences and purposes. At the end of the quarter, participants should be able to write a variety of texts in German.

Prerequisite: German 022 or consent of instructor (kharjes@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

Textbook:

  • Pennylyn Dykstra-Pruim and Jennifer Redmann, Schreiben lernen: A Writing Guide for Learners of German  (Yale University Press, 2011)


German 109A. Business German (4 units)
Kirsten Harjes

MWF 9:00 - 9:50A
147 Olson Hall
CRN 73653

Course Description: This course focuses on German business practices and current economic, political and cultural issues relevant to conducting business in the German-speaking world. Exercises in cultural comparison aim to promote intercultural awareness and to set the stage for exploring business practices and language use in their cultural context. Assignments include role-play, reports, compositions and translations.

Topics will include, but are not limited to:

  • Economic Geography: Germany, European Union
  • Germans at Work: Job Listings, Applications, Interviews; Management and Labor as Social Partners, Unions, Collective Bargaining, Strikes, Contracts; Buying and Selling; Business Structure; Business Correspondence; Banking and Finance; Marketing, Advertising
  • German Business Publications

Prerequisite: German 022 or consent of instructor (kharjes@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): None.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • None
     

German 120. Survey of German Culture (4 units)
Chunjie Zhang

MW 10:00-11:50A
192 Young Hall
CRN 73043

Course Description: This course will explore German culture through multimedia forms. We will deal with major political, social, and cultural aspects after 1945 through music, art, theater, radio plays, films, and literature.

We will start the course discussing German political singer/songwriters such as Wolf Biermann and Franz Josef Degenhardt and internationally well-known German art exhibitions such as dOKUMENTA and German artists such as Joseph Beuys. Responding to the experience of World War II, the radio play became a very popular and important genre after 1945 in Germany. We will talk about award-winning writer Ingeborg Bachmann's radio play The Good God of Manhattan and explore the intertextuality between this radio play and the drama The Good Person of Szechwan by Bertolt Brecht, arguably the most famous Marxist playwright and writer in German literature of the twentieth century and beyond. We will also discuss the role of literature by reading Peter Handke's novel A Short Letter for a Long Farewell. In the end, we will deal with German cinema and discuss major trends, directors such as Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Wim Wenders, and topics such as immigrants in Germany and the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Prerequisite: German 022.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Ingeborg Bachmann, Die Hörspiele: Ein Geschäft mit Träumen / Die Zikaden / Der gute Gott von Manhattan  (Piper Taschenbuch, 1976)
  • Heike Groos, "Das ist auch euer Krieg!": Deutsche Soldaten berichten von ihren Einsätzen  (Fischer Taschenbuch, 2011)
  • Martin Durrell, et al., German Grammar Pack: Practising German Grammar [3rd Edition]  (Routledge Books, 2011)

[RECOMMENDED]

  • Hans Wellman, Langenscheidt Großwörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache  (Langenscheidt, 2010)
     

  GRADUATE COURSES  


German 297. Special Topics in German Literature

Section 001. Early Marx (4 units)
Sven-Erik Rose

T 2:10-5:00P
5 Wellman
CRN 55974

Course Description: Marx's radical social critique was forged and refined in a rich and volatile context of Left Hegelian thought in Germany in the late 1830s and 1840s. Throughout his years of university study, while still hoping to attain an academic position, to his turn to radical journalism to his embrace of communism and political activism, Marx worked out his ideas in a series of collaborations, and heated polemics. So imbricated are Marx's early ideas with those of the thinkers and colleagues he thought with and against that it is impossible to appreciate them fully without delving into the conceptual and rhetorical dynamics of the wider political and philosophical discourse. We will explore the evolution of Marx's thinking alongside texts by major figures from whom Marx borrowed and whom he critiqued, including G. W. F. Hegel, Bruno Bauer, Arnold Ruge, Friedrich Engels, Ludwig Feuerbach, Moses Hess, Max Stirner, and Jean-Paul Proudhon. We will also read classic and contemporary assessments of Marx's early thought by scholars and thinkers including György Lukács, Louis Althusser, David McLellan, David Leopold, and Warren Breckman.

Prerequisite: None.

Format: Seminar- 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Karl Marx, The First Writings of Karl Marx, edited by Paul M. Schafer  (Ig Publishing, 2006)
  • Karl Marx, Early Writings, translated by Rodney Livingstone and Gregor Benton  (Penguin Classics, 1992)

 

Section 002. China, Europe, and Representation I: History, Capitalism, and Vitality (4 units)
Chunjie Zhang

W 2:10-5:00P
5 Wellman Hall
CRN 73044

Course Description: “Whither China?” has become one of the central questions in global public consciousness. This question about the future of a significant civilization and political entity is deeply related to the past of the representations of China in European intellectual history. The theoretical concern about how to approach and understand the making and the reality of China is of utmost importance. How or does the “West” know China? How or does China know the “West”? How does such a strict division between China and the “West” come into being? Does this division make sense? This graduate seminar explores these questions from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and consists of two parts offered in two consecutive academic years. This year, the first section focuses on three related issues. Despite the favorite reception of China in the early eighteenth century, China was used as the major example of historical stagnancy to justify the logic of historical development and European superiority in Hegel’s immensely influential philosophy of history. This historicist separation of China from Europe, though featuring a completely different approach, corresponds to Max Weber’s economic and religious division between China and Europe that willfully interprets the rise of capitalism in the northern European and German protestant ethic. However, different to Weber’s ardent nationalism and rationalist Eurocentrism, literary writer Alfred Döblin sees positive values in Chinese Daoism in his novel The Three Leaps of Wang Lun, while Bertolt Brecht integrates Chinese Moism with communist ideology in his philosophical novel Me-ti. While Döblin and Brecht’s approaches toward Chinese philosophy articulate a pessimistic belief in the Decline of the West, as Oswald Spengler elaborates, they also had hope for a new vitality borrowed from the Far East. We also read Stuart Hall’s analysis of cultural representations to analyze and examine the representations of China in these significant German-language texts that have sustained huge impact on “Western” images of China and on the conceptions of modern societies more generally.

Prerequisite: None.

Format: Seminar- 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Alfred Döblin, The Three Leaps of Wang Lun: A Chinese Novel, translated by C.D. Godwin  (New York Review Books, 2015)
  • Max Weber, The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, translated by Stephen Kalberg  (Oxford University Press, 2010)
  • Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, The Philosophy of History, translated by J. Sibree  (Dover Books, 2004)
  • Oswald Spengler, The Decline of the West, translated by Arthur Helps and Charles Francis Atkinson  (Oxford University Press, 1991)
  • Representation: Cultural Representations and Signifying Practices [2nd Edition], edited by Stuart Hall, et. al.  (SAGE Publications, 2013)