Fall 2013

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Lower Division Courses

German 1. Elementary German (5 units)

Section     Instructor Day/Time Room CRN
01 Konrad Mathesius M-F 8:00-8:50A 251 Olson 35916
02 Katja Herges M-F 9:00-9:50A 251 Olson 35917
03 Amila Becirbegovic         M-F 10:00-10:50A         290 Hickey Gym           35918    

Description of course: This is an introduction to German grammar and development of all language skills in a cultural context with special emphasis on communication.

Course Placement: Students who have successfully completed, with a C- or better, German 2 or 3 in the 10th or higher grade in high school may receive unit credit for this course on a P/NP grading basis only. Although a passing grade will be charged to the student's P/NP option, no petition is required. All other students will receive a letter grade unless a P/NP petition is filed. For more information, please contact the instructor or the German staff adviser directly.

Course Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

GE (Old): None.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Texts:

Option 1: 
- Textbook: Vorsprung 3rd edition (loose-leaf or bound) by Thomas Lovik, Douglas Guy and Monika Chavez (Heinle Cengage Learning, 2013)
- a Quia Access Code for all of the homework and lab assignments (course code provided by instructor)

Option 2:
- eBook version of Vorsprung 3rd edition (order ISBN10:1-133-60735-7 at http://www.cengagebrain.com/shop/isbn/9781133607359; it should cost about $117). If you are considering the eBook, you must be sure that you can bring your ipad/laptop to class every day.
- a Quia Access Code for all of the homework and lab assignments (course code provided by instructor).


German 2. Elementary German (5 units)

Brandon Winter
M-F 9:00 - 9:50A, 117 Olson
CRN 35919

Description of course: This is the continuation of German 1 in areas of grammar and the basic language skills, and the second course in the Elementary German series.

Prerequisite: German 1.

Course Format: Discussion - 5 hours; Laboratory - 1 hour.

GE (Old): None.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Texts:

Option 1: "Bundle” textbook, which includes the required Instant Access Code for all of your homework and lab assignments, from the UCD bookstore: Vorsprung: A Communicative Introduction to German Language and Culture, 2nd Edition by Thomas Lovik, J. Douglas Guy and Monika Chavez (Boston: Houghton Mifflin). 

Option 2: Used textbook (make sure you get the 2nd edition), and, separately, a new Instant Access Code. The UCD bookstore sells these Access Codes separately for those who have obtained a used textbook. If they are out of Access Codes, have them order you one. If you want to order the Access Code directly from the publisher (a bit more expensive than the bookstore), order this from Cengage Learning (www.cengage.com): Quia Instant Access Code for Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung: A Communicative Introduction to German Language and Culture, 2nd Edition

Option 3: Buy the Instant Access Code from the bookstore or online, just like you would for option 2, and then, instead of getting the regular, hard-cover textbook, buy the eBook version of Vorsprung, 2nd Edition. If you are considering the eBook, you need to be sure that you will be able to bring your laptop/ipad/tablet, etc. to class every day.


German 20. Intermediate German (4 units)

Cameron Mortimer
MWF 9:00 - 9:50A, 105 Olson
CRN 35920

Description of course: This is the first course of 2nd year German. Students will review grammar, and begin to read and discuss short, literary texts of cultural and historical interest. Class is conducted in German.

Prerequisite: German 3.  May be taken concurrently with German 6.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

GE (Old): None.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Texts:

  • T. Barske, M. McKinistry, K. Schestokat, J. Sokolovsky, Denk Mal (Vista Higher Learning)
     

German 21. Intermediate German (4 units)

Lauren Nossett
MWF 11:00 - 11:50A, 25 Wellman
CRN 35921

Description of course: Review of grammatical principles by means of written exercises, expanding of vocabulary through readings of modern texts.

Prerequisite: German 20

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

GE (Old): None.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Texts:

  • T. Barske, M. McKinistry, K. Schestokat, J. Sokolovsky, Denk Mal (Vista Higher Learning)
     

German 48. Myth and Saga in the Germanic Cultures (4 units)

Carlee Arnett
MWF 11:00 - 11:50A, 126 Wellman
CRN 54049

Description of course: This course will introduce students to the world of Germanic mythology. It will begin with a systematic analysis of the Nordic realm of gods and heroes and continue with the reading of several of the Old Norse sagas, tales of sex and violence, passion and revenge, which over the centuries have maintained a thrilling vitality. Knowledge of German not required.

Prerequisite: None (The class will be conducted in English).

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

GE (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Texts:

  • H.R. Ellis Davidson, Gods and Myths of Northern Europe (Penguin Books, 1965)
  • Anthony Faulkes, Edda
  • Anonymous, The Saga of the Volsungs, translated by Jesse L. Byock (Penguin Classics, 2000)
  • Anonymous, Beowulf: A New Verse Translation, translated by Seamus Heaney (W.W. Norton & Company, 2001)
     

Upper Division Courses

German 101A. Survey of German Literature, 800-1800 (4 units)

Kirsten Harjes
MWF 10:00-10:50A, 105 Wellman
CRN 35944

Description of course: The course will cover German literature from the Middle Ages to the Classicism with an overview of major movements and authors.

Prerequisite: German 22.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours.

GE (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Texts:

  • Gudrun Clay, 1000 Jahre Deutsche Literatur, 2nd Edition (Focus Publishing, 2008)
     

German 112. Travel and the Modern World (4 units)

Chunjie Zhang
TR 1:40 - 3:00P, 223 Olson
CRN 53681

Description of course: When and how did we get to know the exact geography of the earth? How did we get to know other countries and languages? Why do people sometimes have prejudices towards other cultures? Is national or cultural identity something permanently stable? How should we deal with the challenges of globalization with different cultures, languages, religions, and their conflicts? This course aims to explore these big questions through the lenses of travel writings, literary works, and philosophical essays from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. This course aims to convey the idea that travel is one of the crucial human activities inherently connected to global modernity. If scientific expeditions broaden personal horizons and encounters the unknown, then literature is the imaginative journey that negotiates new experiences and reflects upon nature, culture, individual human life, and collective activities such as trade or revolution. Participants deal with themes such as the mutual influence of transcultural experiences and European Enlightenment ideologies of race, history, and progress, the relations between European colonialism and its present-day ethical indictment, the utopian quality of non-European spaces and cultures for the European idea of freedom, revolution, and interiority, and technology and transculturation.

We will read canonical as well as less-studied literary works and travel narratives. This course surveys five different topics from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Each section contains both travel narrative and literary or philosophical works. While travel narratives function more like descriptive and fact-based reports, literature and philosophical essays convey cultural, social, and political imagination and moralization of the information provided in travelogues.

Prerequisites: Upper division standing or consent of instructor.

Course Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Extensive Writing.

GE (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Texts:

  • Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness and The Congo Diary (Penguin Classics, 2007)
  • Charles Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle: Charles Darwin's Journal of Research (Penguin Classics, 1989)
  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract and the First and Second Discourses (Yale University Press, 2002)
  • Jules Verne, Around the World in 80 Days (Oxford University Press, 2008)
     

German 141. Holocaust and its Literary Representation (4 Units)

Sven-Erik Rose
MWF 12:10 - 1:00P, 223 Olson
CRN 54132

Description of course: Without representations of the Holocaust in literature (testimony, memoir, fiction, and poetry) and visual culture (photography, cinema, TV, graphic novel, painting, and monuments), Holocaust remembrance would scarcely be possible. Yet representing the Holocaust also presents a tangle of critical and ethical questions. In this course, we will explore the role of literary and visual representations in shaping and sustaining different understandings of the Holocaust in very different contexts ranging, historically, from the immediate aftermath of World War II and, geo-politically and culturally, from Communist East Europe to West Europe to Israel and the United States. What could—and couldn’t—be said about what we now call the Holocaust in these various contexts? Students will gain an understanding of how the memory of the Holocaust has evolved over time and how certain literary and visual works have shaped this evolution most profoundly.

Prerequisite:  None.

Course Format: Lecture - 2 hours; Discussion - 1 hour; Term Paper.

GE (Old): Arts & Humanities and Writing Experience.
GE (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Text:

  • Elie Wiesel, Night (Hill and Wang, 2006)
  • Art Spiegelman, Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds History (Pantheon, 1986)
  • Art Spiegelman, Maus II: A Survivor's Tale: And Here My Troubles Began (Pantheon, 1991)
  • Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl (Bantam, 1997)
  • Primo Levi, Survival in Auschwitz (CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2013
     

Graduate Courses


German 297. Sec. 02: Cosmopolitanism: History and Meaning (4 Units) 

Chunjie Zhang
M 4:10 - 7:00P, 109 Olson
CRN 53680

Description of course: This course examines the notion of cosmopolitanism in its historical dimension and the contemporary debates on its semantic diversities through four thematic sections. Situating cosmopolitanism foremost in western context and reading it next to the notions of relativism, nation, and identity, we will start with Immanuel Kant’s idea of cosmopolitanism in the eighteenth century and its contemporary interpretations. We will then turn our attention to Martha Nussbaum’s advocacy of cosmopolitan values in the discussion about cultural identity, global education, and national sovereignty. Then we will discuss Kwame Anthony Appiah’s idea of a rooted cosmopolitanism. In the fourth section, we will enrich our conversation with David Harvey’s insights on Kantian cosmopolitanism, its geopolitical and historical limits, its colonial and racial connotations, and the possibility of reimagining a new geography of freedom. In conclusion, we will have the honor to hear Professor Ban Wang, Stanford University, lecture on Kant’s cosmopolitanism in relation to the Chinese thinker and political reformer Kang Youwei’s cosmopolitan ideas around 1900. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Course Format: Seminar- 3 hours; Term Paper.

Texts:

  • Kwame Anthony Appiah, Cosmopolitanism: Ethics in a World of Strangers (W.W. Norton & Company, 2007)
  • Garrett Wallace Brown and David Held, The Cosmopolitanism Reader (Polity, 2010)
  • David Harvey, Cosmopolitanism and the Geographies of Freedom (Columbia University Press, 2009)
     

German 390A. Teaching of German (2 Units) 

Carlee Arnett
Day/Time TBA, Room TBA
CRN @

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Course Format: Lecture - 2 hours.

(S/U grading only)


Other Courses Taught by German Faculty

MST 130A (MW 12:10 - 2:00P, 90 Social Sciences, CRN 53501) by Carlee Arnett